How Pain Reveals Your Next Career Step…

Here’s an article I wrote about finding your meaningful work more than ten years ago. Still true…

Peter was a 40-year-old computer programmer who hated his job and had a passion for race-car driving. He spent so much time at the race track that his marriage was in trouble. His doctor prescribed anti-depressants and sent him to me for career counseling. Peter’s story was unforgettable.

One night when Peter was 13, his 16-year-old sister woke him up. “Mom and dad have gone out. Get in the back seat of the car and shut up,” she whispered. “We’re going for a ride.”

Peter followed her into the family car and fell asleep in the back seat. He woke up hours later in the darkness, in a ditch, unable to find his sister. She was pinned under the car and died instantly. That moment changed his life forever. His parents divorced, his father became an alcoholic, and “no one ever spoke about the accident. In fact, no one ever spoke at all,” he remembered. Peter became an outcast in high school and learned to bottle up his feelings. “Have a stiff upper lip and carry on,” was his father’s only advice.

As my client, he explored this memory and realized that each time he raced a car at 80 miles an hour around a race track he was healing a childhood wound. He was reliving and re-programming the event that had destroyed his childhood. He was taking control of his greatest pain – the loss of his sister and family. He also recognized that teaching someone else how to navigate a speeding car was a profoundly healing experience for him.

By facing his pain, Peter gave himself permission to pursue a career as a race car driving instructor and a race car service and repair shop owner. By honestly sharing his insights with his wife and daughter, he rallied their support for his new direction. He found renewed intimacy in his marriage, and gave himself permission to pursue work that he loved.

This brings me to the most powerful truth I know about meaningful work: Your pain is your greatest ally for finding work you love. Consider the possibility that you chose (consciously or unconsciously) every job you’ve had in your lifetime because it was healing you.

Hundreds of my clients have proven this to be true. From observing their experiences and studying the biographies of successful people, I am 100% SURE that our pain guides us to our true work; and that our true work heals our greatest pain.

How? Our work heals us by letting us offer to the world exactly what we need to heal ourselves. By facing our pain, we turn it into energy. It becomes our ally and moves us forward. Ask yourself what pain needs healing now? Let that answer guide you to work you love.

Here’s the secret: The more pain you feel, the more energy you have to launch your new career. See the pain as fuel – not as something that stops you from moving forward.

“There is no coming to consciousness without pain.” Carl Jung

In my 20s, I enjoyed a career as a mountaineering instructor for Colorado Outward Bound School. I loved empowering people and inspiring them to overcome their fears. Throughout my own childhood (as a woman growing up in the south in the 50s), I felt afraid and unempowered. This work of empowering others felt very meaningful to me; it was healing my childhood wounds. And I was having great fun!

I was married to a fellow mountaineer whom I adored, and our happy life was filled with climbing adventures and mountaineering trips.

My husband had stomach problems but was told by a couple doctors that it was nothing more than a nervous stomach or the beginnings of an ulcer. By the time we got a proper diagnosis of colon cancer, the doctors gave Paul two weeks to live. (This was in the late 70s before colonoscopies were used routinely.)

Paul died one year later. From that moment on, I couldn’t climb or teach mountaineering anymore. My life changed, and my work changed. I went back to school to study journalism and spent the next 15 years working as a newspaper reporter (health writer), magazine editor (writing about natural health), and a VP of Content for natural health websites. I was passionate about writing stories that helped people prevent disease and live healthy lives. I was healing my own pain with each story.

As my awareness evolved through spiritual work, I became passionate about helping everyone see their greatness, their indestructible soul, and the mission they came to accomplish. I allowed my intuition to flow through untethered and used it to help others. I learned to focus on the client’s luminous spirit, the great potential they came to fulfill in this lifetime, and the beauty of their pain story – so perfectly designed to help them evolve. This is the work I do today.

When you’re unhappy in your career, it’s time to face your greatest ally – your pain. The pain you’re feeling deep inside of you is like a beacon calling for your attention. It’s telling you what you need to know so your life can move forward.

Your pain needs to be recognized, listened to, and turned into fuel to move your life forward. How do you turn your pain into fuel? First by recognizing what your greatest pain is, and then by recognizing how to heal that pain through your work. Your career then becomes a powerful platform for healing you and healing others. Remember, the more pain you have, the more fuel you have. Consider your pain to be your greatest blessing and move forward.

Seeing Through The Eyes of Your Soul

eyes-show-your-strengthYou either believe in divine order or you don’t. It’s an all or nothing thing. Either you’re aware that all events occur for your soul’s growth, your highest good, and the highest good of all – or life feels chaotic, painful and meaningless.

Each day provides opportunities to shift back and forth between those two views until you fully align with the view that empowers you most and moves your life in a positive direction. Only then can you fulfill your soul’s mission and live up to your greatest potential.

You may find yourself saying, “Things happen for a reason” when you get a new job, your business is thriving, you fall in love, have a baby, or gain recognition. You slip on the lens of divine order at those moments and offer gratitude to a loving God or a divine universe that operates for your highest good.

When things aren’t going so well; when you lose that great job, when you’re facing bankruptcy, your spouse divorces you, or your child dies in a tragic accident – you may feel angry at a God who could cause such cruel suffering, or you may rage at an unjust universe where tragic events unfold for no reason.

This is your awakening moment – when your soul is being pushed to the next level of your growth – which is exactly what you agreed to experience before this lifetime began. It’s also when you find out if you’re living from your soul’s perspective, your divine view, or from your ego self. Read more

Talking To Loved Ones On The Other Side

1Our pain and grief is meant to open our hearts, strengthen our connection to the divine & inspire us to accomplish our soul’s greatest mission and tells us why.

Talking To Loved Ones On The Other Side

  • How do you communicate with the other side? Can others develop this ability?
  • Do our departed loved ones try to communicate with us often? Do we block it out?
  • How can you recognize a sign from the other side?
  • Why do you think we need to communicate? How does it help heal our pain and grief?
  • You say that grief is meant to open our hearts, why is that?
[audio:https://careerintuitive.info/audio/10.10.13-Annie-Jenning.mp3]

The Shelly Wilson Show with Sue Frederick

Recently featured on “The Shelly Wilson Show” we had a wonderful conversation on drawing upon dreams, ancient numerology, powerful intuition, and conversations with spirits to help fulfill your soul’s mission and use pain as inspiration for a meaningful life.

Our Impermanent Permanence: Riding the Waves

wavesWe want to believe that everything lasts. We last. Our loved ones last. That what we feel today is forever.

But it’s more like water. Waves upon waves of change and uncertainty shifting around us causing us to lose our footing – to go under and drink the salty brine and come up gasping for air – unsure of who we are. Where we are. Or if we’re alone.

We instinctively search for a horizon. A landing place. Safety. Anywhere. Until we find something solid to gaze upon and we feel secure again. Certain nothing will change.

But we’re still standing in the ocean…

The next wave is always bigger and knocks us over because we had our back to it.

We learn. We open our arms wide and embrace the waves. Laugh as they lift us higher in the air to reveal the greater view – the bigger picture. Hungrily we drink in that vast landscape noting the lighthouse we never saw before, the gull resting calmly on nothing halfway out to nowhere, and the long glistening white fish jumping high above the wave teasing us with its mystery.

We marvel at beauty. Knowing that something creates this – if not the gull itself. If not the water itself. A divine poet arranges the details. But who and how? We write books about this unknowingness, create careers analyzing it, build damns and concrete roads and bridges and still the water swirls around us mysteriously because we are amidst the living sea.

We are the living sea. That sea is in us; it courses through our veins; beats in our hearts. Just when we think we’ve discovered everything, that no one has ever known as much…

A wave rolls towards us from nowhere and we are teetering terrified above everything in the rush of changing water. We surrender once again to the power of the grand poet – as we’re pushed back to the ground by the force of the wave – our limbs dancing madly out of control, our heads brushing painfully against the sand, twisting and turning with abandon – until the wave releases us again. We struggle to our feet gasping – taking in raw sobbing breaths. Calling out to our friends whom we may have lost in the crushing waves.

Someday we do arrive on the beach through no efforts of our own. Then we realize we had choices in how we rode those waves. There are others who floated above them and some who fought and loss and drowned beneath them, and many who struggled endlessly when they only needed to surrender to the ride, rest their heads upon the salty brine – not trying to stand where it was impossible to stand.

And we see that we exhausted ourselves when we fought it, and that it would have been wiser to relax, surrender, laugh and even reach towards someone else who was going under.

We see then that all bodies make it to shore one day or another – one way or another. And that all that ever mattered was how we rode the lovely waves. And if we brought someone along with us to the vast white shore.